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Letters: Rep. Nielson: Laura Belnap best choice for school board
Oct 31, 2014 | 45 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Dear Editor: 

In my mind, the most important race we'll be deciding is the State School Board. I'll be voting for Laura Belnap, and I invite you to join me. Let me tell you why. The State School Board listens to many voices, as it should, and all of those voices are important. I believe the most significant voices come from educators and from parents. Both groups are important; it's critical that the school board balance the input between them carefully. 

From what I have seen in watching and working with the State School Board, the school board's balance has tipped toward educators more than toward parents for as long as I can remember. Parents have told me again and again that they aren't being heard. I think it's time that we search for new school board members that will strike a better balance and provide more equity in how the board handles input from educators and parents alike. 

Laura Belnap is best positioned to add this breadth of focus to our State Board of Education. I know this because of: The priorities Laura has focused on consistently when she has met with me about educational issues before the legislature, and Laura's career-long emphasis on giving parents additional tools to help their children succeed with their education. Laura's focus on parents is just what our State School Board needs. And I can tell you honestly, if the board were putting most of its focus on parents and neglecting input from educators, I would feel the need for more balance in that direction as well. 

If that were the case I might well be supporting a different candidate. But the candidate we need today, for the balance the State Board of Education needs today, is Laura Belnap. Please join me in voting for Laura Belnap for State School Board, District 5. See Laura's website for more information. LauraBelnap.com 

Representative Jim Nielson

Bountiful


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The Marriage Wars: Are siblings key to a child’s development?
Oct 31, 2014 | 182 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Marriage Wars
Marriage Wars
slideshow

By MARK GRAY

An expectant mother-to-be told me she was “really looking forward” to having her first baby.  When I asked how many children she and her husband planned on having, she answered, “Two or three at least. I mean we’d never let our son or daughter be an only child.”

Why not? I would never designate a certain number of children as being the “right” number, and families don’t fall under the one-size-fits-all description.  As an only child, however, I enthusiastically rush  to defend the one-child family as a perfectly working model.

To no one’s surprise, children cost a lot of money.  While I don’t agree with the statistical summaries that peg raising a child at $50,000 and up, children don’t come on the cheap – and without family farms, they don’t contribute to the family bank accounts.

An “only child” isn’t necessarily babied or placed on a pedestal simply because the parents can focus more attention on a single individual rather than three or four siblings.  My parents could always show up for my Little League games because they didn’t have to figure out whose event to attend; that’s parenting, not pampering.  Spending quality time with a parent or the family having more disposable income to purchase music lessons, educational opportunities, etc., should not be viewed negatively.

A key to “only child” development is to ensure the boy or girl is not isolated from other children.  Instead of associating with brothers or sisters, my parents made sure I was enrolled in summer church and other youth social events.  I never felt lonely, and I can easily tout the benefits of being an “only”; in hindsight I’m not sure I would have wanted a handful of siblings gaming my parents for their undivided attention.  

By DAWN BRANDVOLD-GRAY

My husband does not fit any of the negative stereotypes of only children. He is not selfish. He doesn’t pout if he doesn’t get his way. He does have many of the positive traits.  He is content by himself and he is very articulate – a result of having adult conversations from an early age.  He is an example of why being an “only” isn’t a bad thing.

I grew up the baby of five.  Having more children did stretch my parents’ ability to give individual attention, but I never noticed, probably because at least one sibling was bound to show up to a ball game or school program.  It was a built-in cheering section.

Having siblings means you are never lonely. My second brother was my partner in crime. He aided and abetted my active imagination without complaint. His loyalty was second to none.

Older brothers and sisters can help navigate the treacherous waters of junior high and high school. 

They aren’t as far removed as parents from the experience and they can give advice that doesn’t sound preachy.  And as parents age, it is good to have other shoulders to cry on.

It’s not all unicorns and rainbows growing up with siblings.  My oldest brother made it his life’s goal to torment me. We are not talking playful teasing. We are talking full on torture that only brothers of little sisters can inflict.  However, I learned some useful skills. I learned to keep a low profile, measure my words, and call for help when necessary.

Being part of a clan of five taught me to compromise, share, and negotiate. 

In the end, whether it’s a family of three or a family of seven – or a family you’ve gathered about you when the blood ties don’t work out – even if it’s only one other person...as long as they’ve got my back, that’s family enough for me.    


 

 

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Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by an offensive lineman downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by an offensive lineman downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
slideshow
Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by offensive lineman Sam VanWynen (No. 57) downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by offensive lineman Sam VanWynen (No. 57) downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
slideshow
State 5A playoffs: Darts fall to Jordan Beetdiggers, 41-21
by SHAIN GILLET
Oct 31, 2014 | 204 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by an offensive lineman downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
Darts quarterback Parker Christiansen throws a pass under pressure to Mason White (No. 28), who is led by an offensive lineman downfield. Davis lost to Jordan in the first round of the state 5A football playoffs Friday, 41-29. Photo by Jen Barnett | photo-jen-ics.smugmug.com
slideshow

KAYSVILLE – It was déjà vu all over again for the Davis Darts football team Friday afternoon.

For the second time in as many seasons the Darts were eliminated in the first round of the 5A playoffs, losing to Jordan and the Beetdiggers 41-29.

Davis and Jordan played a close first half with the Darts striking the first blow in the opening quarter. Following a fumble by Jordan, Davis went on a five-play, 41 yard drive that ended with Mason White scoring on an 11-yard run. Chase Clampitt’s PAT gave Davis a 7-0 lead.

Jordan struck quickly to tie the game, going five plays and covering 84 yards with Jordan quarterback Austin Kafentzis finding Josh Villamore for a 36-yard touchdown pass.

Two Jordan drives later the Beetdiggers scored again to take a 13-7 lead, this time on a 13-yard scamper by Daniel Loua. The extra point attempt was missed, allowing the Darts to tie the game before the half ended.

Davis close the gap to three points on its next drive on a Clampitt 45-yard field goal. Clampitt connected again before the half, a 51-yarder that wowed the crowd and tied the game at 13.

However, things started going south for Davis to start the second half. Jordan took its opening drive 50 yards for a touchdown to lead 20-13 and forced Davis to go three-and-out in its first drive.

Despite Kafentzis throwing an interception on the very next play, the Darts turned the ball over on downs after quarterback Parker Christiansen barely missed receiver Mitch Rogers in the end zone on a fourth and inches situation.

Jordan was forced to punt on the ensuing drive, but a controversial fumble call that was recovered by Jordan stood and the Beetdiggers scored on their next possession to take a 14-point lead.

Christiansen threw an interception on the Darts first play following the score, and Jordan quickly took advantage by scoring another touchdown. The Jordan drive went 24 yards on seven plays and was capped off by a Kafentzis four-yard touchdown run.

Jordan also scored on its next drive, marching 80 yards on five plays for a 41-13 lead.

Christiansen threw two touchdown passes late in the game, one to Christian Smith and another to Conner Simonsen. A pair of converted two-point plays capped off the scoring.

Davis ends the season 7-3 overall and was 5-1 in Region 1 play.

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