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Laurence Linton Memmott
Apr 24, 2017 | 223 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
May 4, 1919 ~ March 21, 2017 (age 97) Please join us in celebrating the beautiful life of our one-of-a-kind dad, Laurence Linton Memmott, who passed away peacefully on Monday, March 21 in Bountiful. Laurence was born just outside of Nephi on the Broadhead Ranch to Samuel Fenton and Ida Linton Memmott on May 4, 1919. After being raised on a farm in Nephi, he graduated from Juab High School and later attended Dixie College. His interest centered around agriculture and the livestock industry. Although dad’s love for sheep began early with a pet lamb, and later with a first-place 4H ram, his first real paying job in the sheep business began when he became the field man for Utah Wool Marketing Association. For the rest of his life, he traveled the ranch roads of the Western states buying wool and sheep. During those years, he created lifelong friendships and became well respected in the industry. That, and his family, were the love of his life. A firm participator in the gospel of Jesus Christ, Larry served the LDS Church in numerous callings and positions. Forever a missionary, Dad served a mission to Quebec, Canada and later with his sweetheart in Australia, and Christchurch, New Zealand which was truly a highlight of their life. He continued to feel that call to serve right to the end of his 98 years. Born with a beautiful baritone voice which was perfected around the family piano with his four brothers, he soon began entertaining others with his talent for singing. He was known to drive hundreds of miles to share his music at weddings, funerals, Wool Grower conventions. He sang on KSL radio and even on television. He loved entertaining and had a charismatic personality to match. Larry is survived by his children: L. Craig (Geri) Memmott of Layton, Guye F. (Ginger) Memmott of North Salt Lake, and Chalane (David) Wright of Bountiful, youngest brother Duane Memmott of St. George, sister-in-law Joyce Memmott of Nephi and 69 grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife Grace Blackett, infant son Marriner, and son MacCary O. Memmott. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Monday, March 27 in the Woods Cross 2nd Ward Chapel, 790 West 1500 South, Woods Cross. Interment was at Lakeview Memorial Cemetery, Bountiful.
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©Disneynature
©Disneynature
slideshow
Movie Beat: Love and death in “Born in China”
by JENNIFFER WARDELL
Apr 21, 2017 | 900 views | 0 0 comments | 65 65 recommendations | email to a friend | print
©Disneynature
©Disneynature
slideshow

Rated G

Written by David Fowler, Brian Leith, Phil Chapman and Chuan Lu

Directed by Chuan Lu

Narrated by John Krasinski (English-language version) and Xun Zhou (Chinese version)

Grade: Two and a half stars

Nature doesn’t really deal in plot lines, but that doesn’t mean filmmakers don’t try to find them anyway.

Director Chuan Lu does a decent job of it in DisneyNature’s “Born in China,” opening this Friday in honor of Earth Day. The documentary, which focuses on a panda, monkey and snow leopard family as well as other animals, marries human emotion to the lives of animals in order to create narratives for the audience to latch onto. Though hardcore animal lovers will want something a little more scientifically deep and accurate, “Born in China” offers a unique, often funny and emotional opportunity to bond with animals on the other side of the world.

The rapidly paced film, only 76 minutes long, follows the animals through just over a year of their lives. All four of the stories focus specifically on families, mostly mothers and babies (though the golden monkeys plot focuses on an older brother dealing with a new baby sister). The movie balances pure animal moments, including a dominance fight between two female snow leopards, with emotional narration that highlights the loneliness of a young monkey or the protectiveness of the panda mother.

There’s a lot of emotion-based narration in the movie, and biologists might cry foul at the way that the film regularly attributes human emotions to the animals’ situations. By focusing on the feelings, however, the movie gives audience members not used to documentaries something to grab onto. It turns the animals into characters, and as a result deepens the audiences’ emotional attachment to them.

There are risks, of course. With animal documentaries death is always an option, and here one of the three animal subplots ends up with tragedy for all. Though we see a body the movie is deliberately vague about the aftermath, focusing instead on the Chinese belief that cranes take departed souls into the afterlife. Young kids might have question for their parents, though, so be prepared for that.

Thanks to cinematographers Irmin Kerck, Justin Maguire, Shane Moore, Rolf Steinmann, and Paul Stewart, the visuals are absolutely beautiful. China’s appearance in film has mostly involved the country’s cities, and their unexpectedness makes the sight of snow-covered mountains, lush forests and wide plain areas even more of a visual treat.

The movie is also surprisingly funny, though in a low-key way that never becomes imposing. Narrator John Krasinski helps with that, using a subtly dry timing that adds to the humor of the movie’s gentle asides. He also works well with the serious moments, never getting in the way of the animals.

Note: If you see “Born in China” opening weekend, DisneyNature will make a donation in your honor to the World Wildlife Fund. The donations will benefit pandas and snow leopards. 

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