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Park City Mountain kicking off ski season on Nov. 17
Nov 20, 2017 | 270 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CUTTING A NEW PATH in freshly fallen snow is the goal of all skiers who will take to the Utah slopes starting on Thanksgiving weekend.
CUTTING A NEW PATH in freshly fallen snow is the goal of all skiers who will take to the Utah slopes starting on Thanksgiving weekend.
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Park City Mountain, the largest ski resort in the U.S., is scheduled to open for the season on Friday, Nov. 17 with a celebration at the Park City Mountain Village. This season, the resort will debut several new signature events, a new beginner ski area, a complimentary historic mining ski tour and a $15 million renovation of the Grand Summit Hotel at Canyons Village. The resort is also announcing changes to public night skiing as well as a new directed parking system at the Park City Mountain Village.   

“There’s a lot to look forward to at Park City Mountain this season,” said Bill Rock, chief operating officer at Park City Mountain, in a release to the Clipper. “We’re scheduled to be one of the first ski resorts to open in Utah this winter and our mountain operations team is hard at work to ensure that we have the best grooming and conditions possible for the start of the season. This is a great time for Utah locals to hit the slopes early, warm up their ski legs and get the most out of their Epic Pass.”

The resort will open on Friday, Nov. 17. Opening Day events are scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. at the Park City Mountain Village with live music, giveaways and complimentary hot chocolate and coffee. The first chair will leave at 9 a.m. on the Payday lift followed by a ceremonial banner-breaking. The entertainment will continue at 2:30 p.m. with a performance by the Changing Lanes Experience on the Payday deck. 

The Canyons Village is scheduled to open the following week on Wednesday, Nov. 22.

Locals won’t want to miss out on the early season at Park City Mountain this year. Following Opening Day, Park City Mountain will celebrate the first 30 days of the season with special offers and events for locals and Epic Pass holders including live music, free concerts and discounts on dining and ski tuning. It’s the perfect time for locals to get a start on the season and take full advantage of their Epic Pass. 

Sunday, Nov. 19 is the deadline to purchase an Epic Local Pass. The Epic Local Pass is the best way for Utah skiers and snowboarders to access Park City Mountain all season long. With limited blackout dates, the pass pays for itself in just over three visits and provides more than 30 percent savings compared to purchasing lift tickets at a lift ticket window. Visit EpicPass.com for more information.

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‘Cutting’ competition draws riders from around the west
by LOUISE R. SHAW
Nov 20, 2017 | 299 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Riders warm up their horses inside the Legacy Events Center arena prior to participating in the Utah Cutting Horse Association competition earlier this month.
Riders warm up their horses inside the Legacy Events Center arena prior to participating in the Utah Cutting Horse Association competition earlier this month.
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FARMINGTON—A sport that developed in response to a practical need came to Davis County earlier this month, bringing people and horses from across the west.

The Utah Cutting Horse Association sponsored its fall competition at the Legacy Events Center Oct. 26 through Nov. 4. 

Riders from Canada, plus Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada, Arizona, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado joined riders in Utah to showcase the skills of their horses in the competition.

“It’s the most highly trained equine sport there is,” said Kathryn Webb, secretary for the Utah Cutting Horse Association. 

One participant from Wyoming called it a ballet for horses.

During a two-and-a-half minute event, the horse and rider must “cut,” or separate, a heifer from a group of young cattle. The rider then puts his hand down and the horse works independently to keep it from returning to the herd.

The sport came from a skill needed in the open range during the era of the old west. 

Cattle from different ranches mixed on the range and twice a year ranchers would round them up and sort their brands with the help of highly trained horses.

That effort turned into a competition, first held in 1898. The National Cutting Horse Association standardized rules in 1946 and competitions are now held by 139 U.S. and foreign affiliates, according to material provided by the UCHA. 

Those competitions involve more than 17,000 people and the National Cutting Horse Association now has 2,200 approved shows annually. Around $42 million in prize money is awarded each year.

More than 4,000 head of cattle were rented from Deseret Land and Livestock for the Davis County competition, said Webb. Besides stalls existing at the events center, another 160 were brought in for a total of 368, an example of the scope of the event.

People from all walks of life have become involved in the sport, she said.

“We have financial planners, cardiologists, screen writers and neurosurgeons,” she said, “and of course cowboys and cowgirls. We have a big cutting family and we watch out for each other – it’s so amazing.”

Another cutting competition sponsored by the UCHA is planned for next February. More information can be found at utahcha.com.

 
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Six local athletes sign letters of intent
by TOM HARALDSEN
Nov 20, 2017 | 198 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
From left, Jaimee Stahle, Katie Turner, Holland Vande Merwe, Bri Mortensen and Bailey Mittelstaedt of Bountiful High all signed letters of intent to play collegiate sports.
From left, Jaimee Stahle, Katie Turner, Holland Vande Merwe, Bri Mortensen and Bailey Mittelstaedt of Bountiful High all signed letters of intent to play collegiate sports.
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November 8 was a big day for six local female athletes, as they signed letters of intent to play collegiate sports starting next fall.

Ceremonies were held at both Bountiful and Viewmont High Schools for these seniors, each of whom excelled in their sports this year and last. Here in alphabetical order by first name are the athletes who signed letters of intent:

Bailey Mittelstaedt, Bountiful, volleyball, with the University of Nebraska-Omaha

Bri Mortensen, Bountiful, volleyball, with Utah Valley University

Holland Vande Merwe, Bountiful, volleyball, with Salt Lake Community College

Jaimee Stahle, Bountiful, basketball, with Dixie State University

Katie Tanner, Bountiful, softball, with Snow College

Mercedes Staples, Viewmont, basketball, with Clemson University

The Davis Clipper congratulates these young ladies for their achievements!

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From left, Jaimee Stahle, Katie Turner, Holland Vande Merwe, Bri Mortensen and Bailey Mittelstaedt of Bountiful High all signed letters of intent to play collegiate sports.
From left, Jaimee Stahle, Katie Turner, Holland Vande Merwe, Bri Mortensen and Bailey Mittelstaedt of Bountiful High all signed letters of intent to play collegiate sports.
slideshow
CUTTING A NEW PATH in freshly fallen snow is the goal of all skiers who will take to the Utah slopes starting on Thanksgiving weekend.
CUTTING A NEW PATH in freshly fallen snow is the goal of all skiers who will take to the Utah slopes starting on Thanksgiving weekend.
slideshow
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