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Kaysville 9/11 Memorial unveiled
Sep 12, 2013 | 1192 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
LIZ HOWELL removes the covering on a plaque honoring her husband, who died in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon in 2001. Fay Dolan (left) and Ariel Platt Chu-jon also participated in the unveiling ceremony at USU’s Botanical Center in Kaysville. Dolan’s son, Daniel, died in Iraq in 2006. Chu-jon was one of several artists whose work is on a plaque. 
Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
LIZ HOWELL removes the covering on a plaque honoring her husband, who died in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon in 2001. Fay Dolan (left) and Ariel Platt Chu-jon also participated in the unveiling ceremony at USU’s Botanical Center in Kaysville. Dolan’s son, Daniel, died in Iraq in 2006. Chu-jon was one of several artists whose work is on a plaque. Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer

KAYSVILLE — Just above the plaque that features the three Utahns who died in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, is the word, “Hope.”

Liz Howell, the wife of Brady Howell, stood below the word as she unveiled the plaque, one of six that make up the newly completed memorial at USU Botanical Center in Kaysville.

Later, she and two others, would let white balloons fly, signifying the innocence of those victims.

Another 129 blue balloons were then released, symbolic of the 129 military men and women from Utah who have died in the wars that resulted.

 “I’m grateful that Americans continue to remember what happened that day,” said Howell. Such memorials, she said, remind us of the resilience of our nation.

Her husband was working at the Pentagon when planes flew into it, just as two planes had earlier flown into the two towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, resulting in the towers’ collapse. Another plane would fly into the ground in Pennsylvania after passengers tried to keep it from its intended target, which some believe was the U.S. Capitol.

“Each of us have defining events in our lives,” said Lt. Gov. Greg Bell, in the memorial service that preceded the unveiling. “Some are shared by others ... It seems like the world comes unhinged and the ground is moving beneath our feet.”

Feelings of doubt, uncertainty and fear resulted, but the first lesson learned, he said, was that what really matters are people.

“We need to go forward with appreciation for what we have,” said Bell, and as “warriors for civilization.”

Hundreds gathered for the early morning memorial service near the Kaysville ponds.

Firefighters, police officers, members of the military and veterans were also in full dress uniform and honored as part of the memorial.

The program was written and directed by Margaret Brough. Her daughter, Margaret Wahlstrom, lost a mother- and sister-in-law in the tragedy.

Mary Alice Wahlstrom and Carolyn Ann Beug had been flying home after helping two of Beug’s daughters get established in school in Rhode Island when their plane was overtaken.

Besides the plaques, a large statue honoring first responders was unveiled. It features a firefighter looking heavenward with a child in his arms, and was created by Angela Johnson, who was also in attendance at the memorial.

“We must never forget that day,” said Major General Brian Tarbet, of Kaysville,who retired last year as the adjutant general of the Utah National Guard. He reminded the audience of the words of George Santayana, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

“Thank you for helping us remember,” he said.

lshaw@davisclipper.com
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