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Local filmmaker heads back to the past
May 31, 2013 | 749 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
T.C. Christensen looks into a camera on the set of “Ephraim’s Rescue.” During a scene where the actors had to cross a river with handcarts, the current was so strong that one of the handcarts was lost down the river.                                                                            Courtesy photos
T.C. Christensen looks into a camera on the set of “Ephraim’s Rescue.” During a scene where the actors had to cross a river with handcarts, the current was so strong that one of the handcarts was lost down the river. Courtesy photos
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BY JENNIFFER WARDELL

Clipper Staff Writer

LAYTON — Once again, local filmmaker T.C. Christensen is bringing history to life. 

The writer and director, who first hit the big screen with 2011’s “17 Miracles,” is back with another tale of pioneers, danger and hope. His latest movie, “Ephraim’s Rescue,” follows two men as they prepare to face the greatest challenge of their lives. 

For Christensen, heading back into the public eye has its own challenges. 

“I’m still in that apprehensive state,” he said. “For all I know, my mom’s the only one who’s gonna see it.”

Though the success of “17 Miracles” has given him both a following and a proven track record with his studio, he’s not counting on his previous success. 

“In Hollywood, you’re only as good as your last picture,” he said. “The public’s fickle, the time of year has an effect Р so many things factor in.”

Still, things are looking pretty good for the movie at the moment. Though it was initially planned to open in only 19 theaters, the number has since expanded to 23. Many of those theaters are in Utah, but some are located as far away as Mississippi. 

“I don’t like to open in too many theaters,” he said. “You want the movie to build. If you open in too many theaters, you could kill it.” 

Christensen is already pursuing the rights to his next movie, which will be based on a book. Though he’s excited about the project, he said he won’t start writing the script until he’s sure it will happen. 

“It’s too heart-wrenching when you start the script and the project doesn’t work out,” he said. 

Though he’s staying silent about the details until the legalities are straightened out, there is one thing he’ll admit about the project. 

“It’s not a pioneer film, which means there will be no outside shots in the middle of winter,” he said with a laugh. “The crew’s gonna love that.” 

 jwardell@davisclipper.com

 

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