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Golf tourney benefits Children’s Justice Center
Jul 04, 2015 | 191 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(Commissioners): Davis County leaders joined 21 other foursomes in the annual event. From left are Davis County Commissioner Jim Smith; Davis County Clerk/Auditor Curtis Koch; John Schneiter-owner of Schneiter’s Bluff Golf Course; Commissioner John Petroff; and Mike Petrofff.horts).).
Courtesy photo
(Commissioners): Davis County leaders joined 21 other foursomes in the annual event. From left are Davis County Commissioner Jim Smith; Davis County Clerk/Auditor Curtis Koch; John Schneiter-owner of Schneiter’s Bluff Golf Course; Commissioner John Petroff; and Mike Petrofff.horts).). Courtesy photo
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The winning foursome poses at the first tee of Schneiter’s Bluff Golf Course with PGA Professional Jon Schneiter (far left) – Layne Winzeler, J Dee Rasmussen, Ken Colledge and Dennis Steele.
Courtesy photo
The winning foursome poses at the first tee of Schneiter’s Bluff Golf Course with PGA Professional Jon Schneiter (far left) – Layne Winzeler, J Dee Rasmussen, Ken Colledge and Dennis Steele. Courtesy photo
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BY CATHERINE GARRETT
Clipper Correspondent

The 17th Annual Friends of Davis County Children’s Justice Center Golf Tournament that was held at Schneiter’s Bluff Golf Course in West Point in mid-June raised nearly $7,000.

“This year’s event went well,” coordinator Barbara Patterson said, of the annual fundraiser that is held “to help the center that takes care of abused kids stay afloat.”

Elizabeth Wood, President of the Davis County CJC Friends Board, said the proceeds specifically support the center’s programs and resources along with training for the medical and mental health professionals who service the children. 

“The center provides a child friendly environment for sexually abused children to be interviewed by law enforcement and child protective services investigators,” Wood said, indicating that more than 1,000 children and family received services from the center in 2014.

Local golf professional John Schneiter helped with this year’s event, as long-time host Bruce Summerhays was unavailable for the tournament.

Area resident Dennis Steele, along with his friends J Dee Rasmussen, Ken Colledge and Layne Winzeler, shot a 21-under to win the 18-hole, 4 man-scramble tournament. Steele has been participating in the tournament the last few years at the encouragement of a friend, Floyd Baham, who is the CJC Board Vice President.

Of the 22 teams formed to participate in this year’s event was a foursome of the Davis County officials, including commissioners Jim Smith and John Petroff, and clerk/auditor Curtis Koch.

“This is a good charity for a good cause,” Steele said. “You can spend your money a lot of ways, and this seems like a great organization to support.”

A garage sale in the spring also raised $10,000 for the center, according to Patterson.

 

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Historic details, light and views grace new Kaysville library
by LOUISE R. SHAW
Jul 04, 2015 | 392 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
LYNNETTE MILLS, Kaysville librarian, Paul Lindsay of Ascent Construction, and Chris Sanford, county library director, (from left) are silhouetted by tall windows of the new library, one of its signature design features. 
Photo by Louise R. Shaw/Davis Clipper
LYNNETTE MILLS, Kaysville librarian, Paul Lindsay of Ascent Construction, and Chris Sanford, county library director, (from left) are silhouetted by tall windows of the new library, one of its signature design features. Photo by Louise R. Shaw/Davis Clipper
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KAYSVILLE – It’s not only about books.

The new library in Kaysville, a branch of the Davis County Library system, is about light and views, patrons, patterns, playfulness and history.

Just six weeks away from the official opening, library officials met Monday to guide a tour of the facility, explain the special touches and point out the significance of the design and decor.

The historical touches begin even before you walk inside.

A dry creek bed runs north of the building to remind patrons of the creek that used to run through the property. The slope of the roof replicates the angles on roofs of the Weinel and Christopher Layton flour mills once prominent east and west of the library lot.

Inside, the large conference room that can double as a recital hall, thanks to a Yamaha piano that is soon to arrive, is named for Roy W. and Elizabeth E. “Tibby” Simmons, whose foundation donated money that allowed for upgrades such as a special acoustic ceiling.

In the great space that will soon fill with shelves and books, a tribute to Alan Blood will recognize the fund he established to purchase books for the Kaysville library and explain the stickers on books that were purchased through his Blood Endowment Fund. 

“This was an important facet,” said Chris Sanford, director of county libraries. “That generosity has allowed us to enhance and expand materials in Kaysville.”

The wood of the circulation and reference desks and the tile on the fireplace reflect the materials used in the LeConte Stewart gallery at the current library. Prints of his work will hang on the walls nearby. Originals, which are owned by the city, are expected to remain in the existing gallery.

In addition to the many nods to history, the library was built to bring in light, showcase views and draw children from the park across the street.

Colored glass sections cut in rectangular patterns are placed at intervals between clear glass panels that draw the eye toward the mountains, the park, the trees and along 100 East.  

A tree-lined walkway was placed to draw children from the playground to the library, and a special nook with children’s books is decorated with wall art designed to expand their imaginations.

Conference rooms can be rented for meetings and a corner room filled with light and views is for quiet study.

There are no pillars to divide the large, high-ceilinged space for books, something Lynnette Mills, Kaysville librarian, said will help librarians see patrons’ needs and offer help. Alcoves around the room provide quiet places to study or read.  

A raised floor allows for the heating and cooling system, according to Jerry Meyer, assistant county librarian, and for “power and data lines, offering great flexibility” for whatever needs the future brings.

The new library has space for 12 computers, twice the number at the current library. It will open with 75,000 books (the current library has 67,500) and a capacity of 100,000.

It was built and furnished at a total cost of around $5 million, said Sanford. Ascent Construction oversaw construction.

On Thursday, Aug. 6 at 5 p.m., a special event will be held to celebrate the old library prior to its closing. Over the following week, books will be transferred and shelved with newly purchased books now stored in the basement of the Clearfield branch. 

A ribbon cutting ceremony is being planned for the morning of Saturday, Aug. 15 at 9:30 a.m., followed by a celebration at the park in anticipation of the library opening.

The event will include miniature train rides around the park, face painting, jugglers, storytellers and music, and will run until 12:30 p.m.

The library opens at 10 a.m. for tours and by 1 p.m., it will be “business as usual,” said Sanford.

   

 

 

 

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Former Viewmont star found dead in California
Jul 03, 2015 | 669 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Jackson Vroman, 34, the former Viewmont basketball star who played collegiately and professionally in both the NBA and internationally, was found dead at his home in Los Angeles on Monday morning. Numerous reports said Vroman, whose father Brett Vroman played for the Utah Jazz, was found in his pool.

The Los Angeles County coroner’s office said a report about the details of Vroman’s death might be available in a day or two, though as of our Clipper press deadline on Tuesday, nothing had been released.

First reports of his death on Monday indicated he had been killed in a car accident, but law enforcement officials in Los Angeles quickly dispelled that rumor. As of Tuesday afternoon, no funeral arrangements had been announced.

Vroman was a star for the Vikings, then attended Snow College and eventually Iowa State University, where he was second-team Big 12 as both a junior and senior. He helped lead the Cyclones into the NIT semifinals his senior year. Though he was born in California and raised in Bountiful, he became a naturalized Lebanese citizen to play for the Lebanon national basketball team, ironically, replacing the other naturalized American Lebanese player, Joe Vogel.

He was a second-round NBA pick by the Phoenix Suns in 2004 (they acquired that pick on a trade with the Chicago Bulls), and he played for the Phoenix Suns and the New Orleans Hornets/New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets, averaging 4.6 points and 3.8 rebounds per game.During the 2004-05 NBA season he was part of a trade that saw him and teammates Casey Jacobsen and Maciej Lampe being sent to the Hornets for guard Jim Jackson.

In the 2006/07 season, Vroman began playing in Europe, first with CB Gran Canaria in the Spanish ACB. He began the 2007/08 season with CB Girona before being signed by BC Lietuvos Rytas in February 2008. In October 2010, he signed with the Dongguan Leopards in China. For the 2011-2012 season, he signed with the Incheon ET Land Elephants in South Korea, but in December 2011, he signed a contract with the Jiangsu Dragons.

He then signed for the Barangay Ginebra Kings in the Philippines and played his first game for them on March 4, 2012. Later that year, he joined the Shandong Lions of China.

Brett Vroman was a high school star at Provo High School, later playing at UCLA and UNLV before starting a 12-year professional career. Most of those years were spent playing Europe for teams in Italy, Greece and Finland.

tharaldsen@davisclipper.com

 

 

 

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EMILIA CLARKE as Sarah Connor in “Terminator Genisys,” the latest attempt to bring some juice back to the series. 
© 2015 Paramount Pictures
EMILIA CLARKE as Sarah Connor in “Terminator Genisys,” the latest attempt to bring some juice back to the series. © 2015 Paramount Pictures
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Salzburger Echo, above, will be among the performers for this year’s concert. 
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Salzburger Echo, above, will be among the performers for this year’s concert. Courtesy photo
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