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World cultures explored at CJHS
May 16, 2013 | 817 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Principal Aaron hogge shares information about Spain with students attending a multi-cultural event at Centennial Junior High (above). Performers from Davis County Ballroom Dance Team (below, center) share some of America’s dance traditions and Chaifen Johnson teaches Marian Whitmer and Sara Edwards (below, from left) about Taiwan.  
Photos by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
Principal Aaron hogge shares information about Spain with students attending a multi-cultural event at Centennial Junior High (above). Performers from Davis County Ballroom Dance Team (below, center) share some of America’s dance traditions and Chaifen Johnson teaches Marian Whitmer and Sara Edwards (below, from left) about Taiwan. Photos by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer

KAYSVILLE — Centennial Junior High students took a quick trip around the world as they took their temporary passports from table to table in the school cafeteria last week.

At one stop, they learned about Native American cradleboards and at another, they tasted tequeno from Venezuela. At another they saw Coke and Pepsi cans labeled in Arabic.

They learned about the geography of Spain and the music of America. They found out more about the cultural contributions of Taiwan and the historic sights of France.

The variety of exhibits, tastes and information was the work of students, teachers, parents and community members who volunteered to share something of their heritage and their experiences at the school.

“We wanted to help our kids see other cultures,” said Beverley Jacobs, the school counselor behind the multi-cultural programs at Centennial. 

“We know it will open up doors for them,” she said, “and we’re finding out some of the kids have some history they don’t know about.”

Jonathan Vegas, with his father, Jesus, and brothers, shared food, music and information from their native Venezuela.

“A lot of people make jokes about me being Mexican because I’m brown,” said Jonathan. “I like that I can show them my real culture.”

Student performers shared traditional American dances and music, plus songs and dances of South America and the Torres Straits Islands north of Australia.

“I think it’s really cool to see the different countries,” said Olivia Nielsen, who emceed the performances. “It’s interesting to learn more about the backgrounds, the history and the foods.”

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