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Prints by masters turns halls into ‘mini-museum’
May 11, 2013 | 864 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
MASTER WORKS by Katsushika Hokusai (far left) and Georges Seurat (left), donated through a grant from art.com, help engage students at Woods Cross Elementary. “We feel very lucky to have received these pieces,” said ReNae Bennett, a fourth grade teacher.  
Photos by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
MASTER WORKS by Katsushika Hokusai (far left) and Georges Seurat (left), donated through a grant from art.com, help engage students at Woods Cross Elementary. “We feel very lucky to have received these pieces,” said ReNae Bennett, a fourth grade teacher. Photos by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer

WOODS CROSS — The halls at Woods Cross Elementary School host more than the usual display of student artwork.

There are also prints of the work of Vincent Van Gogh, Katsushika Hokusai and Georges Seurat, of Edgar Degas, Winslow Homer and Mary Cassatt, representing many styles and periods.

“Art Sparks Learning,” was the theme of a campaign launched by art.com, which brought the varied master works to the school.

Fourth-grade teacher RaNae Bennett applied for the grant that was eventually awarded to only three schools. 

Besides the Davis County public elementary school, parochial schools in London, England and California received similar grants.

The $5,000 donation paid for 24 framed master works, which Bennett helped select based on art the students learn about through the Meet the Masters program run by parent volunteers.

Parents, organized by the PTA, go into each classroom to teach about the work of an artist and have the students try creating in his or her style, whether impressionism or pointillism.

“The students have been thrilled receiving and viewing this art in the halls,” said Bennett in an email. “They stop and talk about what they have learned ... and get an up-close look at the paintings to review what was talked about.”

Bennett calls the school a “mini-museum,” and loves to hear students comment on the pieces as they pass the art on display.

One student stood before Seurat’s Eiffel Tower with a friend, she said, and told the friend: “This painter never used black.”

The school also received $1,000 in BLICK Art Materials to use for student art projects.

“It has brought an emotion into the classroom that is necessary for excellent and engaged learning,” said Bennett. “The students have been thrilled receiving and viewing this art in the halls.”

lshaw@davisclipper.com

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