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Farmers’ Market closes for the season
Oct 19, 2013 | 2975 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
ELIZABETH AND CHAD MIDGLEY braved the weather to sell their crop of peaches.  
Photo by Tom Busselberg | Davis Clipper
ELIZABETH AND CHAD MIDGLEY braved the weather to sell their crop of peaches. Photo by Tom Busselberg | Davis Clipper
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BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Managing Editor

BOUNTIFUL — Drizzle was no show-stopper for the Bountiful Farmers’ Market last Thursday.

Especially for the last one of the season.

Carolyn Starke of Bountiful didn’t seem to mind the rain, umbrella in hand, as she visited with vendor Jeff Wilson.

She chatted with him about Rogliano’s Authentic Dressings that Wilson was selling from his booth. He was giving out small sampler cups of bread and cucumbers doused with the dressing to give passers-by a taste.  

As with so much offered for sale at the market, it’s a one-of-a-kind dressing – made from his wife Veronica’s grandmother’s recipe.  That’s where the Rogliano name comes from.

Rogliano’s Authentic Dressings is a family affair, although Veronica handles most of the day-to-day operations, including guarding the family recipe, and Jeff lends a hand. For him, it’s a hobby. He’s a computer programmer for a firm in New York.

“The farmers’ market’s been amazing,” Jeff Wilson said. “Our sales this year have been two times what they were last year.”

The Wilsons’ first bottles were sold off a shelf at Dinners by Diana, a Layton meals ready-to-go store.

Today there are locations stocking the salad dressing from Cache County to Riverton, and shortly south to Provo, Jeff Wilson said.

 That includes Winegar’s in Bountiful, where sales have steadily climbed, he said.

“We love Bountiful,” the Layton resident said.

At a nearby craft booth, wooden carved rolling mice are the attraction, said wood carver Garth M. Woolsey.

The West Bountiful resident and his wife Debbie said they weren’t dampened themselves by the weather and few customers.

That’s because they don’t depend only on customers stopping by their booth for business.

“Garth is doing very well with this,” said Debbie Woolsey, who her husband calls his promoter.

“A lot of people come by and order online,” she said.  Many people’s first exposure to their products may be at the farmers’ market – but they often place custom-made orders online.

 A farmers’ market wouldn’t be complete without some produce fresh to the season.

Chad and Elizabeth Midgley were selling big bounties of peaches. They came fresh off the trees from their Syracuse orchards.

Finally, customers and vendors alike could satisfy their appetite and quench their thirst, thanks to a number of vendors who braved the weather.

Giuseppe from Marcello’s was situated on the south end of the market space, close to the University of Utah Bountiful Center’s parking lot.

In typical Southern Italian gusto, he was vocally hawking his  hot Italian sausage on ciabatta bread and various pasta dishes.

 His Argentine-Italian cuisine-themed booth was joined by a couple of others set up nearby, filling the air with a variety of different hunger-creating aromas.

Last Thursday wasn’t typical of the year for the Farmers’ Market, said market founder Mary Carpenter.

“The last three weeks traffic has been down due to the weather,” she said. “Overall, it’s been up.

“At the beginning of the year we had to turn some crafters away who were interested in participating,” only due to lack of more booth space, she quickly added.

This year, the market closed one week earlier than usual. With secondary water shut off Oct. 1 instead of Oct. 15, “some farmers needed to call it,” Carpenter said.

The market takes place from late June to sometime in October (water permitting), between 100 and 200 South, between the tabernacle and University of Utah Bountiful Center.

tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

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