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Weaving a story-telling adventure
by LOUISE R. SHAW
Mar 11, 2014 | 1740 views | 0 0 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Weber State Storytelling festival at Davis Conference Center - Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
Weber State Storytelling festival at Davis Conference Center - Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
slideshow
Weber State Storytelling festival at Davis Conference Center - Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
Weber State Storytelling festival at Davis Conference Center - Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
slideshow

LAYTON - One told a story about a dog and a porcupine, another of making friends with the monster under her bed. Two shared the tale of monkeys and the moon and another told a story from his childhood so convincingly you weren’t entirely sure if he was making it up.

All were performers at this year’s Weber State University Storytelling Festival held, in part, at the Davis Conference Center.

Nancy Wang came from San Francisco to take part in the annual festival now in its 18th year.

“We feel it’s very important that the children and adults understand we’re all the same,” she said.

The stories she and Robert Kikuchi-Yngojo tell as the storytelling duo Eth-Noh-Tec, are from Asian traditions and represent tales from countries such as Tibet and Cambodia.

“We want to build the cultural bridges that celebrate diversity and create compassionate communities,” she said.

David Bullock of Park City, tells stories every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. on KPCW.org.

“I learned how to lie at a very young age,” he jokes. But when they’re woven as stories, “I don’t get in very much trouble.”

Between telling his stories, Len Cabral encourages students to tell their own and to listen to those of their parents and grandparents.

“It’s important for kids to know how to communicate,” said Cabral, an internationally acclaimed storyteller. In school and in any job, he said, it is important to be able to speak publicly.

Kids are quick to say they don’t have any interesting stories in their lives, he said, but it’s important for them know they do and to tell their own stories and learn about others’.

“Now is the time to get stories from their grandparents,” he said. “They can’t always be there.”

Marci Leos, a fifth grader from Tolman Elementary, was so excited about the festival she couldn’t sleep the night before, said her grandmother, Ann Elite.

“I really liked their motions and how they raised their voices,” said Marci. “I want to be a writer and write stories that start saddish but get happy. It catches people’s attention.”

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