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Local marine laid to rest with military honors
by LOUISE R. SHAW
Aug 14, 2014 | 1222 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
ETHEN LYON, (right), the son of David Lyon, walks with his father’s friends, Andrew Bottrell (left) and Zach Clayton. The dog in their company is Stanley, the service dog who helped David Lyon in the years between his accident and his death. 
Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
ETHEN LYON, (right), the son of David Lyon, walks with his father’s friends, Andrew Bottrell (left) and Zach Clayton. The dog in their company is Stanley, the service dog who helped David Lyon in the years between his accident and his death. Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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David Lyon funeral in Kaysville.  Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
David Lyon funeral in Kaysville. Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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KAYSVILLE — Mike Lyon said his brother, David, was not a complainer.

Not when he was sent on his fifth deployment.

Not when his legs were blown off above the knee.

Not through a long and painful rehabilitation.

Mike Lyon spoke in tribute to his brother on Friday, Aug. 8, after David Lyon’s funeral in Layton and the full military honors at his graveside service in the Kaysville cemetery.

“He wasn’t a complainer, he wasn’t a whiner,” said Mike Lyon.

What he was, said his brother, was an extremely qualified bomb technician, skilled even to the level of being able to defuse a nuclear bomb.

David Lyon was just returning to his vehicle with his team after defusing a bomb in Afghanistan when he stepped on an improvised explosive devise that had gone undetected even by bomb-sniffing dogs.

He never lost consciousness, said his brother, and guided his fellow marines in the steps required to keep him alive, including pressure on arteries, applying tourniquets and performing a blood transfusion in the field.

That was in 2010.

Four years later, a tear in his aorta while working out was not properly diagnosed for several days and eventually took his life, according to Mike Lyon.

“He was a great man that helped others,” said Andrew Botrell, a fellow veteran and amputee who had been in rehab with him in California.

“Dave was an amazing person,” said Zach Clayton, who had served with David Lyon as a member of the First Explosive Ordnance Disposal squad based at Camp Pendleton.

“He was very heartfelt and compassionate and he tried to help out anybody he could in whatever way he could,” said Clayton.  “After meeting him you kind of felt like you’d known him your whole life.”

Clayton came from Texas for the funeral.

Lyon had served two tours in Afghanistan, two in Iraq and one in Cambodia.

He was 32 when he died and in a memorial tribute, his family called him, “Our son, brother, father and greatest of all, our hero.”

He is the son of Gordon and Lynnette Lyon, who have seven children. All their sons have served in military, representing every branch, according to Mike Lyon.

“David endured more pain, suffering and setbacks than imaginable,” wrote his family in the obituary published by Lindquist Mortuaries. “Through it all, he was positive, fighting back the pain with inner strength and hard work.”

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